Broadcasts in a Native Language, Speaking to Every Corner of Peru

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Luis Soto, left, hosts a daily sports program with Percy Chile and 
Saturnino Pulla on Radio Inti Raymi in Peru.CreditAngela Ponce for 
The New York Times.

By Raúl Vilchi

The language of soccer games is ripe with phrases, metaphors and clichés that reflect modern life: a coach who parks the bus, a midfielder who shoots rockets, a striker who scores with a bicycle kick. But at 11,000 feet in the Peruvian Andes, the vocabulary changes. That is where Luis Soto, who hosts a daily sports program on Radio Inti Raymi, is narrating Peru’s first appearance at the World Cup since 1982 in his native language, Quechua. NEW YORK TIMES.

 

Local Conservancy Now Saving Indigenous Languages Worldwide

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Bloomington’s The Language Conservancy (TLC) works to preserve Native languages that would otherwise be lost. Pictured here is one of the many books the organization produces to assist those trying to learn specific languages. | Photo by Nicole McPheeters

“Excuse me, are you Kevin?” The man has long braided hair, a rolling suitcase, and an armful of colorful hoops. We’re in the lobby of the Monroe County Public Library. He responds with a politely blank “Yes.” Of course he is Kevin.

Before his performance, I sit down for a short interview with Kevin Locke, who is Lakota and Anishnabe. We talk about the stigma that comes out of poverty on reservations and why so many Lakotas don’t speak Lakota anymore… (LIMESTONE POST)

 

The Race to Save the World’s Disappearing Languages

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Every two weeks a language dies. Wikitongues wants to save them.

Many of the world’s most remote languages are in danger of disappearing. Here, neighbors in the Altai mountains in China craft a new pair of skis. The range connects Russia, China, Mongolia, and Kazakhstan, making the threatened Altai language an unusual blend of dialects… NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Coca Cola bringing out its first ever alcoholic drink, based on a Japanese alcopop

AFTER 130 years, Coca Cola is branching out from its traditional flavours and launching a grog infused version of its cult favourite fizzy drink.

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COCA-Cola is one of the most iconic brands in the world — yet it’s never strayed far from its original drinks. That is, until now.The brand is bringing out its first ever alcoholic drink, based on a Japanese alcopop.Coca-Cola is currently in the process of creating their own version of popular Japanese drink Chu-Hi, a fizzy drink with a small amount of shochu alcohol… NEWS.COM.AU

Made in America

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For years, we’ve looked to China for cheap labor. Now Chinese couples are coming to the U.S. for a new form of outsourcing: hiring American women to produce babies.

The New Hope Fertility Center occupies two floors in a sleek office building across from Central Park, a block from the Trump International Hotel. Upstairs, couples who want children but are struggling to conceive sit in a well-appointed waiting room. On the wall, an LCD monitor cycles through a presentation of the clinic’s specialties: in vitro fertilization, egg freezing, genetic testing. Some of the couples, though, are pursuing a different and controversial reproductive service: surrogate pregnancy… NEW REPUBLIC.

Brazil’s Nexo Jornal sticks to its founding principles: Explanatory journalism, subscribers, and no ads

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Brazil is facing a political crisis, and news organizations are facing down a torrent of breaking news as corruption scandals spanning the last several Brazilian presidents continue to roil the country.

In the eye of the storm, the digital outlet Nexo Jornal has tried to carve out a space for itself somewhere in between academic research and explanatory journalism. It’s held firm to its founding notion of being a subscriber-focused business, as it approaches its second year (under a second Brazilian president, who recently survived impeachment)….  NIEMAN LAB

What Music Do Americans Love the Most? 50 Detailed Fan Maps

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YouTube has become a dominant force in the music industry in the last few years, particularly among younger people. With the help of YouTube’s geocoded streaming data, we set out to map the contours of music fandom and culture in the United States.

Of the artists on the Billboard Top 100 this spring, we looked at the 50 that were most watched on YouTube in the United States between January 2016 and April 2017. Each map shows relative popularity in different parts of the country. If one part of a map is lighter, it doesn’t mean people there weren’t watching the artist’s videos; it just means fans were more likely to listen to a variety of other artists.

See the complete set of fan maps below, listed in order of YouTube views in our data… NEW YORK TIMES

Hijab-wearing woman among Apple’s new emojis

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The hijab emoji was approved in November last year [Courtesy Apple]

US tech giant Apple has previewed forthcoming emojis, including one that depicts a woman wearing a hijab.

More than 12 animated symbols were unveiled on Monday to celebrate World Emoji Day and will be released on Apple devices later this year, the company said.

“The new Emoji make it easier for users to express themselves with greater diversity, additional animals and creatures, new smiley faces and more,” Apple said in a statement… ALJAZEERA

“Despacito” is breaking records, making memes, and crossing cultural barriers

Screen_Shot_2017_07_21_at_2.26.47_PM.0In case you’ve been living under a rock, here’s what’s up with “Despacito,” which you’ve undoubtedly heard even from under that rock.

The summer’s Spanish-language megahit from Puerto Rican musician Luis Fonsi and guest Daddy Yankee has been taking over the internet at, ironically, lightning speeds. (“Despacito” means “slowly.”) This week it became the most-streamed song of all time…  VOX