Peru’s Queen of Quechua Rap Wants to Rescue Indigenous Culture With Her Music

Renata Flores is part of a new generation of artists producing contemporary music in Quechua, the language of her ancestors.

Credit…Celia D. Luna

The music video begins with the sweeping views of the snow-capped Andes Mountains and the whistle of the region’s traditional wind instruments.

Then you see Renata Flores. Standing defiantly in the baggy pants, slick ponytail and hoop earrings that have become the uniform of hip-hop artists around the world, she begins to rap — in Quechua, the language of the Incas, whose empire was rooted in these heights.

This blend of traditional and transgressive, rural and urban, local and global, has thrust Ms. Flores, 19, and her music into an intensifying debate over identity in the region, and made her a leader among a new generation of artists producing contemporary music in Quechua, which remains the most widely spoken Indigenous language in Latin America… NYTIMES

Broadcasts in a Native Language, Speaking to Every Corner of Peru

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Luis Soto, left, hosts a daily sports program with Percy Chile and 
Saturnino Pulla on Radio Inti Raymi in Peru.CreditAngela Ponce for 
The New York Times.

By Raúl Vilchi

The language of soccer games is ripe with phrases, metaphors and clichés that reflect modern life: a coach who parks the bus, a midfielder who shoots rockets, a striker who scores with a bicycle kick. But at 11,000 feet in the Peruvian Andes, the vocabulary changes. That is where Luis Soto, who hosts a daily sports program on Radio Inti Raymi, is narrating Peru’s first appearance at the World Cup since 1982 in his native language, Quechua. NEW YORK TIMES.