#iamnotavirus

101544840_160687322136621_616031342563426304_n

Outbreaks of infectious diseases have long inflamed racism and xenophobia in the United States. Fears of the coronavirus have fueled rising anti-Chinese sentiment as a combination of traditional slurs and new terms such as “Kungflu” and “Chinese Virus” conflate the pandemic with ethnic and national identity.

From Koreatown in Los Angeles to Greenwich Village in New York City, Asians have been harassed, pushed, spit upon and attacked under the false assumption that they are to blame. An illustration of this, according to the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council, 1.497 bias-based assaults were reported to their hotline in the month of April.

Ogilvy Health and #iamnotavirus have teamed up to raise awareness of this unacceptable behavior via a provocative campaign on social media and beyond…. OGILVYHEALTH

Constance Wu: Asians And Asian-Americans Are Not The Same

Screen Shot 2017-03-26 at 5.29.28 PM

Asians and Asian-Americans are very different, and actress Constance Wu wishes that more people in the media, film and TV industries realized that.

In an interview with Allure Magazine this week, the star of ABC’s “Fresh Off the Boat” opened up about her experiences as an Asian-American actress. The only characters Wu said she was offered early in her career were supporting roles, like “the best friend or the assistant to the white person,” she told the magazine…THE HUFFINGTON POST