#iamnotavirus

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Outbreaks of infectious diseases have long inflamed racism and xenophobia in the United States. Fears of the coronavirus have fueled rising anti-Chinese sentiment as a combination of traditional slurs and new terms such as “Kungflu” and “Chinese Virus” conflate the pandemic with ethnic and national identity.

From Koreatown in Los Angeles to Greenwich Village in New York City, Asians have been harassed, pushed, spit upon and attacked under the false assumption that they are to blame. An illustration of this, according to the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council, 1.497 bias-based assaults were reported to their hotline in the month of April.

Ogilvy Health and #iamnotavirus have teamed up to raise awareness of this unacceptable behavior via a provocative campaign on social media and beyond…. OGILVYHEALTH

The Spanish ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ Is Being Used to Honor Hispanic Workers Fighting COVID-19. Here’s the History Behind the Lyrics

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By Olivia B. Waxman

hile COVID-19 has been dubbed “the great equalizer” by some, emerging data suggest that minorities in the U.S. are more vulnerable to the coronavirus pandemic on multiple levels. In New York City, for example, preliminary data showed that 34% of fatalities as of April 8 were within the Hispanic community, despite their making up only 29% of the city’s population. Nationwide, Hispanic and Latinx Americans are also the largest uninsured group.

In addition, only 16% of Hispanic workers can do their jobs from home. That means many are essential workers on the front lines of the pandemic fight — in New York City, they make up about 40% of employees at grocery stores, convenience stores and drug stores — and others are unable to work at all. Nationwide, about half of Hispanic people say a household member got a pay cut or lost a job, or both, as a result of COVID-19, compared to 33% of U.S. adults, per a Pew Research Center survey conducted March 19-24.

That disproportionate impact is part of the inspiration for a new video, launched Tuesday, that aims to pay tribute to the roughly 60 million Hispanic people in America and their work on the front lines of this crisis. It also provides a reminder of an often-forgotten slice of American history: the creation of the official Spanish-language national anthem. TIME

New effort aims to provide Covid-19 resources to non-English speakers in U.S.

Poojas-Pics-14-768x432Pooja Chandrashekar, a first-year medical student at Harvard Medical School who founded the Covid-19 Health Literacy Project.

By Shafaq Zia

Covid-19 is impacting lives across the U.S., and health officials are racing to provide communities with important information about the illness. But language divides are likely to put non-English speakers at greater risk. While some health information is being translated into commonly spoken languages including Spanish and Chinese, the U.S. is home to non-English speakers who speak any of more than 350 other languages.

A new initiative from medical students and physicians at Harvard Medical School aims to help members of these communities by translating fact-based Covid-19 information. The initiative, known as the Covid-19 Health Literacy Project, has already translated essential Covid-19 information about prevention and possible treatment options, among other issues, in over 35 languages, including Navajo, Oromo (spoken by an ethnic group in Ethiopia), and Swahili. STATNEWS