Peru’s Queen of Quechua Rap Wants to Rescue Indigenous Culture With Her Music

Renata Flores is part of a new generation of artists producing contemporary music in Quechua, the language of her ancestors.

Credit…Celia D. Luna

The music video begins with the sweeping views of the snow-capped Andes Mountains and the whistle of the region’s traditional wind instruments.

Then you see Renata Flores. Standing defiantly in the baggy pants, slick ponytail and hoop earrings that have become the uniform of hip-hop artists around the world, she begins to rap — in Quechua, the language of the Incas, whose empire was rooted in these heights.

This blend of traditional and transgressive, rural and urban, local and global, has thrust Ms. Flores, 19, and her music into an intensifying debate over identity in the region, and made her a leader among a new generation of artists producing contemporary music in Quechua, which remains the most widely spoken Indigenous language in Latin America… NYTIMES

“Despacito” is breaking records, making memes, and crossing cultural barriers

Screen_Shot_2017_07_21_at_2.26.47_PM.0In case you’ve been living under a rock, here’s what’s up with “Despacito,” which you’ve undoubtedly heard even from under that rock.

The summer’s Spanish-language megahit from Puerto Rican musician Luis Fonsi and guest Daddy Yankee has been taking over the internet at, ironically, lightning speeds. (“Despacito” means “slowly.”) This week it became the most-streamed song of all time…  VOX