New Research Finds Eye-Opening Gaps in Latino Media News Coverage

NEW YORK, NY; Aug. 18, 2020: A research report released today by the Center for Community Media (CCM) shows surprising gaps and biases in news coverage by the Spanish-language media in the United States.

The report, in English and Spanish, is based on an analysis of almost 700,000 Spanish-language news stories in the 41 primary outlets, published during the first three years of the Trump presidency. CCM, which is part of the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, will translate the report from Spanish to English in the coming weeks.

Using a tool to search for specific terms and phrases, Ronny Rojas, an investigative journalist and Newmark J-School faculty member, analyzed the news coverage by the Latino media at a time when Spanish-speaking communities have been the target of government and political leaders in U.S. There are 60 million Latinos in this country, and 40 million people speak Spanish.

While multiple surveys show that Spanish-speaking Latinx audiences are most interested in U.S. news about the economy, healthcare costs, immigration, and, increasingly, race and race relations, these topics comprised a remarkably small and declining share of Spanish-language news coverage during the three years studied. Rojas found that news on jobs and healthcare accounted for just one percent of all stories published or broadcast in Spanish each month, a decrease of 50% between 2017 and 2019…CENTER FOR COMMUNITY MEDIA AT CUNY

AP changes writing style to capitalize ″b″ in Black

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The Associated Press changed its writing style guide Friday to capitalize the “b” in the term Black when referring to people in a racial, ethnic or cultural context, weighing in on a hotly debated issue.

The change conveys “an essential and shared sense of history, identity and community among people who identify as Black, including those in the African diaspora and within Africa,” John Daniszewski, AP’s vice president of standards, said in a blog post Friday. “The lowercase black is a color, not a person.”

The news organization will also now capitalize Indigenous in reference to original inhabitants of a place.

Daniszewski said the revisions aligned with long-standing identifiers such as Latino, Asian American and Native American. He said the decision followed more than two years of research and debate among AP journalists and outside groups and thinkers… APNEWS

 

 

#iamnotavirus

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Outbreaks of infectious diseases have long inflamed racism and xenophobia in the United States. Fears of the coronavirus have fueled rising anti-Chinese sentiment as a combination of traditional slurs and new terms such as “Kungflu” and “Chinese Virus” conflate the pandemic with ethnic and national identity.

From Koreatown in Los Angeles to Greenwich Village in New York City, Asians have been harassed, pushed, spit upon and attacked under the false assumption that they are to blame. An illustration of this, according to the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council, 1.497 bias-based assaults were reported to their hotline in the month of April.

Ogilvy Health and #iamnotavirus have teamed up to raise awareness of this unacceptable behavior via a provocative campaign on social media and beyond…. OGILVYHEALTH